Corporate And Social Responsibility Pdf

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Corporate social responsibility CSR has many advantages that can apply to any business, regardless of its size or sector.

Whilst this is obviously still important, many companies now focus largely on corporate social responsibility. Corporate Social Responsibility CSR is when a company operates in an ethical and sustainable way and deals with its environmental and social impacts. This means a careful consideration of human rights, the community, environment, and society in which it operates. This article outlines the importance of corporate social responsibility, and the benefits that sustainable and ethical practices can bring to your business. Social responsibility and ethical practices are vital to your success.

In Good Company: An Anatomy of Corporate Social Responsibility

As the world becomes increasingly interdependent and fragile, the future at once holds great peril and great promise. To move forward we must recognize that in the midst of a magnificent diversity of cultures and life forms we are one human family and one Earth community with a common destiny.

Indeed, the world is becoming increasingly interdependent and fragile due to a growing population searching for more material wealth, the scarcity of resources, the loss of biodiversity and ecosystems, climate change, shifts in power between States and also between States and multinational companies, wars and international peace processes.

Multinational enterprises MNEs are playing an ever increasing role in this arena: applying environmental care or not , producing and selling arms or not , paying a decent salary to their employees or not , offering remedies to victims of human rights abuses and environmental pollution or not , paying bribes to judges and other people in power or not , lobbying for or against legal measures to reduce greenhouse gases emissions GHG , sponsoring political campaigns, and so forth.

Laws have been drafted that promote socially responsible behaviour by companies. Companies have adopted CSR mission statements and programmes, and are sharing their efforts through sustainability reports.

NGOs have contacted companies and pointed out how they can operate in a more responsible way, and academics have analysed all. CSR is a subject that has links with many areas of law, including international law and European law, corporate law and corporate governance, tort law and contract law, procedural law, labour and environmental law, and criminal law.

All of these areas contribute importantly to the development of CSR, and ultimately to respond to the serious challenges that this world faces. This special issue of the Journal of International and European Law covers various of these areas and offers interesting insights in the developing course of the legal aspects of CSR.

In view of the global challenges, international and European law is particularly indispensable. It includes in short form all principal values covered by among other the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, international human rights and environmental treaties. CSR flourishes when people who have to implement it understand the bigger picture.

As the Preamble of the Earth Charter states:. We are at once citizens of different nations and of one world in which the local and global are linked. Everyone shares responsibility for the present and future well-being of the human family and the larger living world. The Earth Charter may serve the purpose of assisting people in understanding their own responsibility. Nonetheless, as the articles in this Journal will demonstrate, private regulatory regimes, quasi-legal rules and soft law also play an important role in the process of implementation of CSR by companies as well as in the evolution of traditional legal regimes.

She applauds the steady evolution of a global social expectation that companies should respect international human rights standards, 7 but she finds fault at the side of governments which do not enforce legislation concerning for instance employment safety norms. Nolan indicates that such initiatives are helpful to fill in the gap of local public enforcement of labour laws.

Additionally, she adds that legal mechanisms imposed on companies can effectively complement the non-legal approach. She points at the initiative of some States to legislate extraterritorially that companies create transparency about their human rights impact. However, the forum necessitatis theory allows such Home State court to take up the case if there is - in technical or practical terms 10 - no other forum in which the victim can initiate the suit.

In the context of CSR, as has also been mentioned by Nolan, a large variety of private self-regulatory instruments related to social or environmental aspects of economic activities, such as codes of conduct or private labels, have emerged. When public and private norms compete, the most legitimate public or private standard for governing the problem at hand should be chosen. Depending on the situation, a private standard or label could be more legitimate with regard to the interests concerned than a public norm.

Factors that constitute legitimacy are for example the level of participation of relevant stakeholders in the drafting of the norm and whether the decision-making process can be considered a democratic process; the type of the public interest at stake also plays a role.

He reasons that it concerns a State obligation. He asserts that no review mechanism exists, neither domestically nor internationally. The point that Robinson makes is that States should institute effective and efficient access to administrative and independent judicial and non-judicial procedures, including remedies and redress for environmental and human rights harm, also when this has been caused by companies the Earth Charter urges this in provision The decision applied the presumption against extraterritoriality to the ATS.

Thompsom evaluates the decision using the criteria of leading scholars in their discussions regarding American exceptionalism. He comes to the conclusion that ATS litigation in principle has the potential to provide accountability in situations where MNEs commit serious human rights violations.

However, the ATS should not be regarded as a statute that enforces international law. Moreover, Thompson asserts that no binding international law exists in respect of human rights violations committed by companies. Jeffrey A. Van Detta offers a working definition for CSR which insists on going beyond the minimal in protecting and promoting human rights. He proposes an approach to employing disclosures in regulating CSR to promote human rights. Whereas scientific findings indicate that worldwide emissions of greenhouse gases GHG must be cut down drastically if we are to prevent dangerous climate change, still, legislators and companies are not forthcoming in taking actions capable of producing the drastic reductions needed.

Cox underlines that many States have assumed legal obligations to reduce GHG. On November 20, the Dutch NGO Urgenda 25 and individual citizens served summons on the Dutch State in an action to hold the Netherlands liable for its role in causing dangerous global climate change. The goal of the action is to obtain an order obliging the Dutch State to take measures to reduce GHG emissions before Cox is legal counsel to the plaintiffs. In this case note, he presents the arguments invoked against the Dutch State.

In particular, the tort of negligence and the duty of care as well as the principle of several or proportionate liability, both as applied in Dutch law, are elaborated on. Heat stress, floods, sea level rises, the spread of infectious diseases, summer smog, the degradation and loss of ecosystems and flora and fauna and the risks to drinking water and food supplies will contribute to mounting violations, both in the Netherlands, Europe and around the world, of the right to life Article 2 of the European Convention of Human Rights; ECHR and the right to health and respect for private and family life Article 8 of the ECHR.

He describes that in the book the author takes a stand that a CSR approach should be adopted to curb the involvement of multinational companies in corrupt practices, particularly in developing countries.

Corruption is considered a CSR issue which should be regulated in an effective manner. The drafting of the Earth Charter involved the most inclusive and participatory process ever associated with the creation of an international declaration.

This process is the primary source of its legitimacy as a guiding ethical framework. The legitimacy of the document has been further enhanced by its endorsement by over 4, organisations, including many governments and international organizations. Lambooy, T. Legal Aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility. Utrecht Journal of International and European Law , 30 78 , pp.

Lambooy T. Utrecht Journal of International and European Law. Utrecht Journal of International and European Law , 30 78 , 1—6. Lambooy, Tineke. Utrecht Journal of International and European Law 30 78 : 1—6.

Utrecht Journal of International and European Law 30, no. Lambooy, T.. Utrecht Journal of International and European Law , vol. Start Submission. How to Cite: Lambooy, T. Published on 28 Feb CC BY 3. Preamble of the Earth Charter 1 Indeed, the world is becoming increasingly interdependent and fragile due to a growing population searching for more material wealth, the scarcity of resources, the loss of biodiversity and ecosystems, climate change, shifts in power between States and also between States and multinational companies, wars and international peace processes.

Jump to Discussions Related content.

The Importance of Corporate Social Responsibility for Your Business

Sri Lankan corporate sector is now playing a pivotal role in the economy while earning the largest revenue of the country. However, the corporate sector is still identified by the public as a ruthless and unfeeling while motivating solely by profit. This is because some big companies over the years have no concern or desire to support the government of the day to enhance economic growth. Rajmanthri, S. Emerald Group Publishing Limited.

The Truth About CSR

As the world becomes increasingly interdependent and fragile, the future at once holds great peril and great promise. To move forward we must recognize that in the midst of a magnificent diversity of cultures and life forms we are one human family and one Earth community with a common destiny. Indeed, the world is becoming increasingly interdependent and fragile due to a growing population searching for more material wealth, the scarcity of resources, the loss of biodiversity and ecosystems, climate change, shifts in power between States and also between States and multinational companies, wars and international peace processes. Multinational enterprises MNEs are playing an ever increasing role in this arena: applying environmental care or not , producing and selling arms or not , paying a decent salary to their employees or not , offering remedies to victims of human rights abuses and environmental pollution or not , paying bribes to judges and other people in power or not , lobbying for or against legal measures to reduce greenhouse gases emissions GHG , sponsoring political campaigns, and so forth. Laws have been drafted that promote socially responsible behaviour by companies.

Social responsibility

What Is Social Responsibility?

Social responsibility is an ethical framework and suggests that an individual has an obligation to work and cooperate with other individuals and organizations for the benefit of society at large. A trade-off may exist between economic development, in the material sense, and the welfare of the society and environment, [1] though this has been challenged by many reports over the past decade. It pertains not only to business organizations but also to everyone whose any action impacts the environment.

For details on it including licensing , click here. This book is licensed under a Creative Commons by-nc-sa 3. See the license for more details, but that basically means you can share this book as long as you credit the author but see below , don't make money from it, and do make it available to everyone else under the same terms. This content was accessible as of December 29, , and it was downloaded then by Andy Schmitz in an effort to preserve the availability of this book. Normally, the author and publisher would be credited here. However, the publisher has asked for the customary Creative Commons attribution to the original publisher, authors, title, and book URI to be removed.


PDF | In this introductory paper to a new journal, I set the stage with a definition of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) followed by its relation.


4 Comments

  1. Aylen Z. 01.02.2021 at 22:01

    Most companies practice a multifaceted version of CSR that spans theaters ranging from pure philanthropy to environmental sustainability to the explicitly strategic.

  2. Desideria C. 04.02.2021 at 04:34

    1. Defining Corporate Social Responsibility. Introduction. Definitions of CSR. The effects of organisational activity. The principles of CSR.

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